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  • Dec 14th, 2014 12:29 am
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[OP]
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Nov 25, 2009
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Inzer Belt in Canada

Hey guys,

I'm looking to get an Inzer lever belt without having to pay the ridiculous duty charges. Ordering from Inzer directly is working out to around $140 with shipping and duty in and that seems a bit much for a $90 belt. Anybody know of any Canadian sites that sell it or a way to get it closer to MSRP?

Thanks
25 replies
[OP]
Member
Nov 25, 2009
440 posts
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xdragus wrote:
Oct 29th, 2014 8:30 pm
http://innerstrengthproducts.ca/

Should be much more reasonable :)
Thanks! They don't have any mediums for the 10mm lever belt though =/. I sent them an e-mail to ask when they'd get more stock, lets hope soon.
[OP]
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Nov 25, 2009
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I got a quick response letting me know black medium size belts are coming in about two weeks and other colours in about 5 weeks in case someone else is interested and looking as well.
Deal Addict
Jun 21, 2008
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Toronto
You guys know how to figure out what size to get? do you go smaller? so if you're like a 30 - you'd go for the 26-29 instead of the 30-33?
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Aug 22, 2007
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Markham
Ticco wrote:
Oct 30th, 2014 5:33 pm
You guys know how to figure out what size to get? do you go smaller? so if you're like a 30 - you'd go for the 26-29 instead of the 30-33?
You would get a medium. I would try to measure your size closer to your mid-section / belly button area if possible to see if a large may suit you better.

But if you're waist 30 now and plan on slimming down to 28-29" waist then stick to medium.
Member
Nov 17, 2006
393 posts
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Richmond Hill
you better be deadlifting at least 4 plates if you need a belt as expensive as that. Inzer belts are the *****, I hate people seeing with belts and deadlift only 2-3 plates, minimum should be 3.5 plates.
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Jan 25, 2008
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mikenogo wrote:
Nov 8th, 2014 1:18 am
you better be deadlifting at least 4 plates if you need a belt as expensive as that. Inzer belts are the *****, I hate people seeing with belts and deadlift only 2-3 plates, minimum should be 3.5 plates.
I disagree. Belt should be used when form starts to break down since how much you lift is relatively affected by your body weight. A 150 lbs person isn't going to be lifting 4 plates unless he's had some time training.
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Nov 17, 2006
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Richmond Hill
Stretchy wrote:
Nov 8th, 2014 12:48 pm
I disagree. Belt should be used when form starts to break down since how much you lift is relatively affected by your body weight. A 150 lbs person isn't going to be lifting 4 plates unless he's had some time training.
fair enough, but at the same time that usually means you need to improve your core, deadlifts and squatz are CORE heavy, im 150 and i can deadlift 3 plates x5 reps for 3 sets without a belt
weighted crunches are your friend.
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Jul 14, 2008
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Ticco wrote:
Oct 30th, 2014 5:33 pm
You guys know how to figure out what size to get? do you go smaller? so if you're like a 30 - you'd go for the 26-29 instead of the 30-33?
You don't wear belts on the waist. They go around 'your gut'
You need to measure the circumference, usually, at your navel.
If I were you, I wouldn't order a 'smaller' size.
Most people I know, myself included, who came to their point in training where they benefited from a belt, witnessed the reverse.
People who lift heavy squats and deadlifts will likely see an INCREASE in this circumference - and not necessarily because of belly fat (which is obvious).
An increase in the abdominal musculature and lower back muscles will also make you move to the next largest hole in your belt.

I suggest before you think you need a belt, look up what a belt does, doesn't do, and how you're supposed to use it.
People think it 'supports' your back, spine, etc - that's why you see those kinds with a wider back section? Garbage.
They're used to increase isometric pressure of the abdominal wall, and having a belt helps you to increase that pressure with positive feedback.
That increased pressure then supports your spine (e.g., Valsalva maneuver), which should be held during the lift.
And yes, a belt can be TOO tight if you cannot create an effective contraction (and likewise, too loose is not effective either).

Look up info from Mark Rippetoe on the topic, if you want to use a belt properly. A lot of poor info out there. Especially from 'bro science'
[OP]
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Nov 25, 2009
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I totally agree. I have been lifting religiously for three years and am only now investing in a belt as my dead lift and squat have gotten to the point where core stability would be beneficial. I didn't use a belt as I wanted good base core strength and only plan on using it during my heavier sets that are closer to max effort for me.
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cycro27 wrote:
Nov 11th, 2014 6:31 pm
I totally agree. I have been lifting religiously for three years and am only now investing in a belt as my dead lift and squat have gotten to the point where core stability would be beneficial. I didn't use a belt as I wanted good base core strength and only plan on using it during my heavier sets that are closer to max effort for me.
I don't want people to get the idea that you need to be lifting for years before you get benefit from a belt.
If you follow a typical strength routine, for instance, where there is progressive loading every workout, the weight might be heavy enough to warrant its use in a matter of months.
Also keep in mind it doesn't weaken 'your core' - I simply DO NOT do any ab work and I have abdominal musculature because as the weight gets heavier, with squats and deadlifts and presses, for instance, you will naturally build that as well, they are supportive to those compound lifts. Because the belt is not supporting anything, just aiding in positive feedback for a contraction, the contraction will be EVEN GREATER with a belt than without (think about squatting with a broom stick, versus a loaded barbell, there is a difference because of the feedback).
[OP]
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Nov 25, 2009
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onlineharvest wrote:
Nov 11th, 2014 10:02 pm
I don't want people to get the idea that you need to be lifting for years before you get benefit from a belt.
If you follow a typical strength routine, for instance, where there is progressive loading every workout, the weight might be heavy enough to warrant its use in a matter of months.
Also keep in mind it doesn't weaken 'your core' - I simply DO NOT do any ab work and I have abdominal musculature because as the weight gets heavier, with squats and deadlifts and presses, for instance, you will naturally build that as well, they are supportive to those compound lifts. Because the belt is not supporting anything, just aiding in positive feedback for a contraction, the contraction will be EVEN GREATER with a belt than without (think about squatting with a broom stick, versus a loaded barbell, there is a difference because of the feedback).
We can agree to disagree lol. FYI belts are back in stock!
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cycro27 wrote:
Nov 13th, 2014 1:06 am
We can agree to disagree lol. FYI belts are back in stock!
on what?
[OP]
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Nov 25, 2009
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onlineharvest wrote:
Nov 13th, 2014 1:07 am
on what?
I misunderstood what you were saying, I thought you said that beginner SHOULD us a belt.

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